Meet our foreclosure prevention counseling team!

In 2012 HomeSight expanded our foreclosure prevention counseling staff from one counselor to three. Our talented and experienced team includes: Ebony Washington, Kathy Edwards, and Amy Vaimer. Each of our counselors brings unique skills and contributions to our efforts to fight foreclosure.

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(L-R) Amy Vaimer, Kathy Edwards, Ebony Washington

Ebony Washington has been a housing counselor with HomeSight for almost three years. Coming with experience in sales, Ebony skillfully navigates the complicated world of foreclosure prevention with a sense of humor and a feisty determination to help homeowners. Thinking critically and coming up with a course of action for a client is Ebony’s favorite part of the job. She explains that getting clients a modification requires understanding every aspect of a family’s financial situation, negotiating with lenders and servicers, and having an effective strategy. Additionally, in order to be truly helpful, Ebony stresses the importance of staying informed about all programs and resources available to homeowners. This requires educating oneself and staying on top of new developments and policies. Looking ahead, Ebony hopes that in the near future more assistance programs will be available for homeowners who are underwater but still current on their payments. Until then she plans to continue to work hard for those who are trying to save their homes.

Kathy Edwards started at HomeSight in May, after five years of being a housing counselor. Kathy enjoys being able to help people when they are in the midst of such a challenging situation. Along with her experience in the field, Kathy’s kind and caring demeanor make her a knowledgeable, sympathetic counselor. While she enjoys her job, Kathy acknowledges the various challenges and stressors that are unique to her position. As a housing counselor one has to be the go between, advocating for clients and dealing with lenders and servicers. Working so closely with clients, a housing counselor often has to fill many roles, including being: a listening ear, a shoulder to cry on, an advocate, and a friend. A mother herself, Kathy says, “You really want to be able to nurture and fix things right away, but sometimes you can’t.” While the process is obviously stressful for homeowners, our counselors also carry the weight of that stress. At HomeSight, Kathy appreciates that she feels encouraged to work with compassion, and feels like she works with a staff that has a “deep concern for human beings.”

Joining us in late July, HomeSight’s newest counselor is Amy Vaimer. With over nine years of housing counseling experience, Amy brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to our foreclosure prevention department. Originally from Kyrgyzstan, she also brings the unique skill of being fluent in English, Ukrainian, and Russian—which has allowed her to meet with four Russian speaking clients at HomeSight. The other foreign language Amy is fluent in is that of banks and lenders. She says that understanding the foreclosure process is complicated and difficult to understand, but she enjoys being able to act as translator and intermediary for clients. Prior to coming to HomeSight Amy worked at a national housing counseling agency. She finds that because of things like the Foreclosure Fairness Act and the Attorneys General National Mortgage Settlement, Washington State has some of the best available resources for homeowners. Comparing HomeSight to other agencies she’s worked for, Amy appreciates that HomeSight doesn’t see its clients as a number or means to achieve an intake goal, but shows a genuine concern and care for individuals.

When asked what advice they would give families facing foreclosure, all of the counselors agreed that acting early is the best thing a struggling homeowner can do. Contacting a housing counselor at the first signs of trouble or difficulty making payments will increase the options and resources available. They acknowledge that the foreclosure process is scary and can be overwhelming, but their role as housing counselor is to let clients know what their rights are. We are very proud of our foreclosure prevention team, and are pleased to be able to offer our services to homeowners in our community who are struggling to stay in their homes.