February 2017 Newsletter

In This Issue:


Planning Continues for the Southeast Economic Opportunity Center

It’s time to experience the SEOC! After three meetings in which we listened and collected information from community members (over 250 of you have attended a meeting) on what you’d like to see at the Southeast Economic Opportunity Center (SEOC), it’s now time for us to show you what we’ve heard. Join us March 4th at 10:30 a.m. for our penultimate meeting to experience what the SEOC has in store for you.

2017-March-SEOC-Community-Meeting-Half-Flyer_Page_1.pngThe meeting will entail an opportunity to meet with the partner organizations that will locate at the SEOC campus to further ask questions about specific offerings and opportunities. You’ll also be able to see the most current rendering of the campus and speak with the various wellness clinics who are looking to expand locations to better serve their communities. Attendees will also be able to enjoy a potluck lunch featuring local restaurants and enjoy a coffee tasting with Cafe Avole, Cafe Red, and Cafe Zanta.

If the conversation and food hasn’t enticed you yet, we urge you to come out and meet your neighbors! In the spirit of the SEOC, we want to celebrate all the cultural and ethnic diversity in Southeast Seattle with a photo booth and message board that will become a centerpiece for the Economic Opportunity Center building. So come on by to add your photo or a message!

We’ll see you Saturday for food, photos, community and prizes! Oh, did we mention prizes?

Be sure to share the event with your friends on Facebook!


7th Annual Plate of Nations Urges You to Stand Up and Eat!

Come show your support for your ethnic and immigrant neighbors by taking to the streets with chopsticks, forks, spoons, and fingers in this fun (and delicious) event supporting businesses owned by these communities! This signature dine-around event of the MLK Business Association runs March 24 – April 9, 2017, at restaurants along Martin Luther King Jr. Way S. in the culturally rich Rainier Valley. Eleven local venues will offer $15 or $25 meals to share from their global menus, showcasing some of Seattle’s best cultural and ethnic cuisines.

This year, diners can savor traditional and vegetarian culinary delights like: savory chicken shawarma from Bananas Grill; misir wot (split red lentil cooked with sauteed onion, red pepper and tomato sauce) from Cafe Ibex; Central Vietnamese specialty noodle soup bun bo hue from Bun Bo Hue Hoang Lan; black pepper beef from Foo Lam; Northern Vietnamese-style eggplant hot pot from Huong Duong Sunflower; Eritrean lamb and fish tibbs from Momona Cafe; Asian-style Halal lamb curry from Olympic Express Halal Restaurant; traditional Vietnamese shrimp and pork papaya salad from Rainier Restaurant & BBQ; and, “old-skool” East Coast field roast subs from The Original Philly’s.

New to the lineup this year, Amazing Thai joins the event with khao neeo dahm (black sticky rice with coconut milk), and caterer-turned-restaurateur Seasoned in Seattle offers up dishes like the mouth-watering MLK mash-up (smoked mozzarella polenta, wilted greens, and sun-dried tomato cream).

Diners are encouraged to collect passport stamps at each of the 11 venues to qualify for prizes like gift certificates from participating restaurants and, toward the end of the more than two week-long event, larger prizes which will be based on number of stamps collected. And, don’t forget to follow Plate of Nations on Facebook for your chance at randomly-selected prizes throughout the event!


Meet the Home(Sight) Team

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Jeremy Poag, Project Manager

A collegiate defensive tackle for Princeton, lawyer, sound engineer for the International Blues Festival, world traveler, and marathon runner, Jeremy Poag brings a wealth of experience to HomeSight as the newest member of the Real Estate Development Team. Plus, he always wears really fun, bright, matching socks. An admirable quality pointed out by folks on the Community Development Team. So how did Jeremy go from walking in Memphis--where he grew up--to helping build affordable housing in Seattle? Well, dear reader, read our newest edition of The Home Team.

The Home Team: Jeremy Poag, Project Manager

Have you ever cut a rug on Beale Street?

Yes, many a time. It’s the home of the Blues. The International Blues Festival is held there. I was a sound engineer for the festival for a long time.

For many, Elvis was the biggest heart throb to come out of Memphis. Are there any other hunk, a hunk burning loves from Memphis we should know about?

We’ve got Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin,  and Booker T. Jones.

I can keep going... If you mean good looking, we also have Justin Timberlake.

You went to Princeton. Did you eat at a bicker club (essentially a dining hall/social club for upperclassmen)?

Yes. I joined as a Sophomore. There are a few different types of clubs:

  • Sign in - where you put your name on a list.
  • Bicker - where you “bicker” for three days, essentially an interview process. The members interviewing you each have a black and a white ball. At the end of the three days they vote. If they vote all white you are in, if you receive even one black ball you are out.
  • Snicker - a combination of Sign in and Bicker.

The clubs are a good way to interact with classmates regardless of major or sports. They make for a more cohesive university.

I hear you’ve traded in your blue suede shoes for running sneakers. When did you start running and what are some of the more grueling races you’ve participated in?

I started running in 2011 and my 1st marathon was the hardest. It was the New Orleans Marathon. I was training in Memphis where weather was below freezing. I went from that to 70 degree weather in New Orleans. It was incredibly painful.

You travel a lot. Where have you been?

England, Ireland, Scotland, France, The Netherlands, Italy, Switzerland, Greece, Turkey, Japan, Philippines, Mexico, Canada, Iceland, and 45 states.

How did you land in Seattle?

Seattle brought me to Seattle. I came here in 2013.